Saturday, January 15, 2011

Sepia Saturday-Mr. Finwall builds his "dream" house.

My Grandfather built his own house (sometime around the turn of the century). According to my Uncle Glenn it was next to a swamp. I don't think Chicago had swamps so I'm not sure what he meant. One can only imagine! I don't really think it was his dream house but it served the purpose. He was an artist not an architect. He illustrated sheet music. I would love to see some of his work but apparently it was all destroyed during a flood. The house is still there, though, at 7250 Maplewood, Chicago.
The back of the house with his first born, my Uncle Glenn, my grandmother, great aunt, and my great grandmother. (It looks like it's already stating to fall apart.)

The front steps with their growing family.

My sister and I visited the house(in about 2000) which is still standing, although looking a little different.

We met one of the tenants who lived upstairs. A very nice but slightly goofy guy. He enjoyed posing for our camera.




11 comments:

Alan Burnett said...

How fascinating that the house survived and that you were able to visit it. I often think that houses can tell stories that are as rich in history and social change as people can.

Nancy said...

Wow, it does look different. They added a lot of windows. Great photos!

Karen S. said...

What a fine house he built too! Nice pictures! ..and they did change it a bit...one question I've always have is why did so many people back then put their baby in a high chair for the picture? never could understand...if they were in the kitchen yes...Thanks for sharing these!

Lisa said...

So, if it has lasted this long, I would say that your artist grandpa was a pretty darn good carpenter. Very cool that you can still go see the house that he built!

Christine H. said...

How wonderful that it's still standing and that you were able to take pictures.

Marilyn said...

Your photos are wonderful to have, your grandfather did so well to build their family home and it must have been well built for it still to be standing!
How proud they look posing on the steps with their family.
You asked me if my great grandmother sold drapes as she was a draper. She sold dress making fabrics and all that was needed to go with it such as needles & thread, lace and other trims etc. My great grandmother was also a tailoress.

paula said...

Awesome photos! And how fun that you have the address, and that the house is still there. We should all be so lucky!

Food Smarts said...

If that house could talk! How marvelous it must have been to visit. Was it your mother who was the keeper of all these fabulous photos?

L. D. Burgus said...

It looks like it was built on a foundation that was undermined with wet soil. That may be why they called it a swamp as it may have been a low spot in the city where water actually stood. Now a days there bring in lots of soil and raise them up higher.

Pat transplanted to MN said...

that is a great contrast to see today, still standing. So many of the omes of relatives and my family are now gone forever...different in Chicago today for sure, but a great experience. I never thought of swamps in Chicago either, but Larry might have the right idea, above.

TICKLEBEAR said...

some have dreams simple enough to be realistic. good for him. i SO much prefer the original posts and ramps. the current set-up screams "extreme home makeover"!! doesn't look too sturdy...

thanx 4 sharing!!
:)~
HUGZ

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